Categories
English

What are the positive and negative aspects of your solution(s)?

Instructions
Portfolio Assignment Instructions
Please be sure to read all of this assignment descriiption carefully. It’s very detailed. It describes two separate things. However, all items will be submitted in ONE Word document.
The portfolio that contains elements you have been working on throughout the course; and
The final paper (problem analysis) that you will include as part of the portfolio.
Let’s look at the BIG picture first, the final portfolio.
What is a portfolio?
A portfolio is a collection of items organized in a notebook, file, or a similar format. By collecting this information throughout a course, you can clearly see the connections among assignments as well as the progress you have made. In ENGL110, your portfolio will reflect the work you have done in a specific discipline or topic, ending with the analysis of a problem you have explored. Here are the required elements of the portfolio. The required sections are included in the template.
Title Page
Table of Contents
Item 1 of the Portfolio – Descriiption of Discourse Community in Your Field
This is the assignment you submitted in week 2. You are to submit a final version of the descriiption, including any changes recommended to you in the instructor’s feedback.
Item 2 of the Portfolio – Annotated Bibliography for your Final Paper
This is the assignment you submitted in week 4. You are to submit a final version of the annotated bibliography, including any changes recommended to you in the instructor’s feedback.
Item 3 of the Portfolio – Final Paper – Analysis of a Problem
This is the final problem analysis paper that is the culmination of all the work you have done in the course. Please see the complete descriiption of the paper below.
Final Paper (Problem Analysis)
Assignment Instructions
This analysis project requires you to tackle a problem within your field of study by first exploring it, its causes, and its impacts. Then, if you want, you can recommend one or more practical solutions to solve the problem.
After deciding on the problem you wish to tackle, begin building questions about it. Your goal for the analysis is to answer the questions through your sources. Finding multiple angles and perspectives is ideal so that you explore those possibilities in the final paper before settling on your recommendation. Be sure to identify what is at stake.
Here are questions to help guide your analysis:
What is the problem being addressed (explain, describe, and “prove” that it exists)?
Who is affected by this problem?
Why does this problem exist? (Identify the root causes.)
Why does the problem persist? (Identify the major factors that contribute to the problem’s ongoing presence.)
What is at stake if the problem is not solved?
If you decide to include a solution, use these questions to guide you:
Who can take action?
What should they do, exactly?
Why would this help?
What are the positive and negative aspects of your solution(s)?

PURPOSE: To analyze a problem and possibly provide a solution
AUDIENCE: Classmates, others interested in the field
LENGTH: 900 – 1,000 words (Times New Roman font). Please do not go significantly (~10%) under or above the word count requirement. This word count includes only the paragraphs in your final essay (not the Works Cited/References page or previously submitted sections).
SOURCES: 5 (five) sources from the APUS Library (These may include sources you used in previous assignments. Going under this number will cost points in grading.)
FORMAT: The citation style that is appropriate for your discipline

Submit your assignment as a Word document attached to the assignment link so it can be automatically processed through Turnitin. Use either the MLA or APA template provided. You can save the template with a title like this: Your Name Portfolio Final Paper.

Categories
English

Choose a clear organization for the paper that clearly aids understanding (think about your audience the whole time you are writing) ?

In a rhetorical analysis, you should: ? Make a clearly stated, complex claim about the text’s rhetoric and its effectiveness (thesis) ? Contextualize the text using the Rhetorical Triangle (author, audience and purpose) ? Discuss rhetorical appeals of the text (logos, ethos, pathos) ? Observe proper MLA quotation and citation formatting requirement ? Observe proper MLA paper formatting requirement ? Choose a clear organization for the paper that clearly aids understanding (think about your audience the whole time you are writing) ? Create interesting and functional introduction and conclusion paragraphs Your essay should include the following parts: ? Introduction: this is where you introduce the text you will analyze and let the reader know what your standpoint on this text’s rhetoric will be. Be sure to include an explicitly stated thesis. Write in the third person throughout, and use an authoritative tone. ? Body: ? *Contextualize: who is the author, who is the audience, and what is the author’s purpose in this piece of writing? ? *Identify and discuss each of the rhetorical appeals—ethos, pathos, logos ? *Make sure each paragraph has a main point, evidence from the text to support that point, and explanation of the evidence ? *Remember to keep your analysis as objective as possible; discuss the text’s rhetoric, not its subject ? Conclusion: this is where you restate the claim you have made about the text and explain why your analysis supports the claim. You should also use a recognized concluding strategy; a formal conclusion, an implied conclusion, a broader point made of the thesis.

Categories
English

Is healthcare a fundamental human right?

Reasoned Argument—a way of arguing by giving reasons
and examples rather than raising voices. It demands that
positions be supported rather than merely asserted. It also
commands respect for the right of others to disagree with
you as you may disagree with them.
Topic: Is healthcare a fundamental human right?

Categories
English

Discuss the third major concept selected.

any weeks in our ENG 4010 class require you to write a journal. Think of these journals as your opportunity to show off how well you know the course material. Demonstrate that you have engaged with the textbook readings, thought about the ideas presented and how they will impact the way you communicate. These journals are alternatives to quizzes; writing and self-reflection about these readings are a more appropriate assessment for this course. I look forward to your reflections on the text! Work to include specific textual examples from the text which are worth 15% of this assignment’s final grade. Here is some guidance for you and a suggested outline for each journal: Paragraph 1: Introductory paragraph. List the three major concepts from the chapters you plan to discuss in the body paragraphs of this journal. (You need at least one major concept from each chapter assigned; if we read only two chapters, select two concepts from one chapter). Paragraph 2: Discuss the first major concept you selected. Share the name of the concept and the chapter of the book it appeared in. Provide a brief summary of the concept and how it applies to the way you communicate. Paragraph 3: Discuss the next major concept you selected. Remember to cover all chapters with the ideas you select. As mentioned above, share the name of the concept and the chapter of the book it appeared in. Provide a brief summary of the concept and how it applies to the way you communicate. Paragraph 4: Discuss the third major concept selected. Share the name of the concept and the chapter of the book it appeared in. Provide a brief summary of the concept and how it applies to the way you communicate. Paragraph 5: Reflect on what you consider to be the most important idea presented in the reading for the week and how it will impact how you think about communication or how you communicate now.

Categories
English

List office features and functions, as well as pros and cons of each software package—what does each program do, or not do?

The paper is mostly done but needs some final editing touches and the addition of some more sources/quotes to flesh it out. Here are the original instructions below Overview You’ve learned about some of the nonmedical aspects of veterinary medicine: client interaction, staff interaction, office equipment, inventory, and paperwork. Now, it’s time to put that knowledge to use. Instead of taking a final proctored exam, you’ll write a research paper. This research paper should be completed, submitted, and graded before you continue to your next course. As a veterinary technician, you’ll become adept at researching information, both for your own use (continuing education) and for client educational purposes. You should familiarize yourself with the methods of research and be able to analyze, interpret, and understand the material you’ll find. Rewriting this information in your own words will also help you assimilate the information. Instructions There are two papers in this research project. Both research papers are required. Paper 1: Veterinary Computer Software Goals Identify the various types of veterinary software programs that are available. Explain the use and benefits of veterinary software programs in practice. Report the pros and cons of different programs. Categorize and examine the features of various programs. Evaluate your research to determine which programs may provide the best service in a veterinary practice. Instructions Many veterinary clinics and hospitals rely heavily on computers for day-to-day operations. Computer software companies are constantly developing and upgrading programs for use in veterinary medicine. Imagine you’re the head veterinary technician working in a multidoctor veterinary practice. The practice owner is considering upgrading his or her outdated invoicing software and paper medical records, wanting to replace them with veterinary management software that can perform a wide variety of management functions. The practice owner wants each member of the veterinary team to gather information on two different brands of veterinary management software. Each team member will compile his or her information into a written report, which will be given to the practice owner and practice manager to help them make their decision. As the head technician, you’re given the first choice on which software brands to research. Select two different brands of veterinary management software. Research each software brand, paying attention to the items in the following list, then write a research paper that compares and contrasts the two software brands, including (but not limiting your writing to) the following information: Names of the two brands of software that you’ve chosen, and a brief description of each of them Information about the companies who make the software What are some benefits for a practice using a software program? List office features and functions, as well as pros and cons of each software package—what does each program do, or not do? How are technical support issues handled? How is loss of data prevented in each type of program? Is this a cloud- or server-based program? What hardware or software might be required? Is training provided? In what ways? Are laboratory and imaging results imported? Provide details on those that are compatible with the software program being discussed. Paper 2: Interpersonal Communication As a veterinary technician, you’ll be inundated with questions every day. These questions come from clients and coworkers. In order to handle these questions, it’s important that you be both a good listener and a good communicator. Goals List and define the four elements of communication. Identify the methods for effectively communicating with others. Apply knowledge of proper communication methods to client and colleague interactions in a veterinary practice. Determine the importance of using and observing verbal and nonverbal communication. Prepare oneself to work with clients and coworkers as part of the patient care team. Establish adequate communication skills for use in a veterinary setting. Instructions Describe techniques for being a good listener. What can you do to clarify what a client or coworker is saying to you? Also, describe some ways you can communicate clearly so a client or coworker will not only listen to you but fully understand what you’re saying. Be sure to include the following: Body language Nonverbal communication/gestures (including possible cultural differences that might arise) Paraphrasing Eye contact Discrimination and prejudices Patient records/handouts and brochures Any other pertinent information you deem important Next, provide at least two specific scenarios that relate to dealing with others in a hospital setting, and how and why you might use the previously mentioned techniques in these scenarios. Be sure to include multiple examples from the list above. Describe how those techniques would be used in your scenarios. These examples may include conflict with a coworker, conflict with an employee, dealing with a difficult client, or having an emotional conversation with a client. Project Specifications Your project must be submitted as a Word document (.docx, .doc)*. Each title page should contain the following information: The title: Veterinary Office Management Research Project Your name Your student number The date your project was submitted Each paper should be easy to read with appropriate font, double spacing, and correct spelling, grammar, sentence, and paragraph structure. You should use proper APA format for your reference page and in-text citations. The recommended length is 2–4 pages per paper, excluding title and reference pages. Each research paper should include at least three references. The information must be supported by trusted veterinary medical publications and websites. You can use your Penn Foster Veterinary Office Management lessons for assistance, but they shouldn’t be your main source of data. Don’t use sites such as Wikipedia. If you don’t have prior experience writing research papers, the Penn Foster Library offers assistance in writing a research paper and citing references. Plagiarism is taking any part of a published piece of work and using it as your own. This also applies to those sections where you might change the wording slightly, or periodically interject personal comments. This also applies to sections in which whole paragraphs or pages were quoted from a source. Plagiarism is unacceptable at Penn Foster College. This is a reminder of the expectation to which all Penn Foster College students are held. Per your Student Handbook, students are expected to conduct themselves with the highest academic and ethical standards. Failure to do so results in disciplinary action. Be sure you’re properly citing your resources in APA format. More information about plagiarism, and properly citing in APA format, can be found in the Penn Foster Library, your Information Literacy course, and your English Composition course. Grading Criteria Advanced—score of 100% The papers effectively address the purpose of the assignments and the requirements of the prompt. Paper 1: Student thoroughly and accurately identifies and explains all topics or questions in maximum detail. Chose two brands of software Company information/history Benefits of using a software program Features and functions of software Technical support Data backup Cloud or server based, and hardware or software needed Training Lab and imaging results Compare and contrast the different software including pro/cons.

Categories
English

Write an academic essay that creates and argument and a counter argument for an expository report.

Write an academic essay that creates and argument and a counter argument for an expository report. No use of first or second person 1.present clear opinion 2. Integrate relevant counter argument 3. Dismiss and reassert original opinion

Categories
English

When was the essay written, and why is this important?

Summary:
Choose an argument essay that resonates most with you. You can use the linked essay below, or choose a different one (your professor must approve the argument essay beforehand). Keep in mind some of the strategies we covered this week on rhetorical analysis. Our main questions to consider are: who is the intended audience of the essay? is the essay effective? Is this essay credible? What is the article missing? How credible is the author? To better answer these questions, be sure to find the following:
Who is the author, and why is this important?
When was the essay written, and why is this important?
What claim is the author making?
What kind of claim is the author making (fact, value, or policy)? How does the author support this claim?
What is the warrant that connects the claim and the support?
“Why do people spread false information online? The effects of message and viewer characteristics on self-reported likelihood of sharing social media disinformation”
Then, take time to begin your Rhetorical Analysis essay. Be sure to watch the review videos on paraphrasing, intros and conclusions, and body paragraph development first. And remember, this essay should be at least 500 words.
Start with a strong introduction that leads to an argument statement. Was the essay credible? Why or why not? In the body of your essay, be sure each topic sentence supports your thesis. Point to specific areas of the essay to support your points. Don’t forget to remind the reader of your thesis statement before moving to the next paragraph. Finally, be sure to end with a concluding paragraph. Here, you could talk about any holes you found in the essay. What could the author have left out or added to the essay to make it more persuasive? This essay should be in MLA format. You should have a Works Cited page. Be sure to include in-text citations in your body paragraphs.

Categories
English

Explain the two or three points of argument you will use in your supporting paragraphs.

This exam should not take than two hours. Please read the essay, “Plagiarism is not a big moral deal” by Stanley Fish. Download “Plagiarism is not a big moral deal” by Stanley Fish.Organize your paper either as an argument (agreeing or disagreeing with Fish) or a comparison/contrast. You can compare Fish’s article to another article about plagiarism from a UC Library database, but that is all. Go into as much detail as possible, and remember to quote and cite both sources correctly using the MLA Style. Be sure to include a Works Cited page. Here is a sample of three kinds of outlines Download Here is a sample of three kinds of outlinesyou can consider for your midterm; please use one of them.
This assignment will demonstrate to me that you know how to turn in a paper following the MLA Style. Be sure it is spell-checked, cited correctly, double-spaced, and that you post it as a Word document or PDF.
Remember to edit this assignment for the following: organization, correctness and typos, correct use of quotations and citation using the MLA Style, MLA format for your heading and page numbers, and structure.
A good way to organize this paper would be to begin with your thesis (whether or not Dr. Fish’s argument is valid), then include two or three supporting paragraphs based on your argument in support of (or rejecting) it.
Thesis: make a clear statement about whether or not you agree with Fish. Explain the two or three points of argument you will use in your supporting paragraphs.
Supporting Paragraph 1
Supportive detail/quotation
Supportive detail/quotation
Supporting Paragraph 2
Supportive detail/quotation
Supportive detail/quotation
Supporting Paragraph 3 (optional)
Supportive detail/quotation
Supportive detail/quotation
Conclusion: restate your thesis and summarize your argument.
6. Works Cited page
Course Learning Outcomes Achieved
demonstrate skill in college-level writing, reading, and critical thinking
demonstrate in writing the standards of grammar and style
demonstrate an understanding of writing as a process
Rubric
Midterm Rubric
Midterm Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeUse of meaningful quotations from texts discussed
10 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
10 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeCitation of all quotations
10 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
10 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeClear thesis
25 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
25 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeOrganized, clear body paragraph(s) that support the thesis
25 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
25 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeConclusion that restates the thesis and summarizes the argument
10 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
10 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeWorks Cited page
10 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
10 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeSubmitted as a Word or PDF document.
10 pts
Full Marks
0 pts
No Marks
10 pts
Total Points: 100
Plagiarism Is Not a Big Moral DealBy Stanley Fish August 9, 2010 9:00 pm
Stanley Fish on education, law and society.
During my tenure as the dean of a college, I determined that an underperforming program
should be closed. My wife asked me if I had ever set foot on the premises, and when I answered
“no,” she said that I really should do that before wielding the axe.
And so I did, in the company of my senior associate dean. We toured the offices and spoke to
students and staff. In the course of a conversation, one of the program’s co-directors pressed on
me his latest book. I opened it to the concluding chapter, read the first two pages, and remarked
to my associate dean, “This is really good.”
But on the way back to the administration building, I suddenly flashed on the pages I
admired and began to suspect that the reason I liked them so much was that I had written them.
And sure enough, when I got back to my office and pulled one of my books off the shelf, there the
pages were, practically word for word. I telephoned the co-director, and told him that I had been
looking at his book, and wanted to talk about it. He replied eagerly that he would come right
over, but when he came in I pointed him to the two books — his and mine — set out next to each
other with the relevant passages outlined by a marker.
He turned white and said that he and his co-author had divided the responsibilities for the book’s
chapters and that he had not written (perhaps “written” should be in quotes) this one. I contacted
the co-author and he wrote back to me something about graduate student researchers who had
given him material that was not properly identified. I made a few half-hearted efforts to contact
the book’s publisher, but I didn’t persist and I pretty much forgot about it, although the memory
returns whenever I read yet another piece (like one that appeared recently in The Times) about
3/18/2021 Plagiarism Is Not a Big Moral Deal – The New York Times
https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/09/plagiarism-is-not-a-big-moral-deal/ 2/4
the ubiquity of plagiarism, the failure of students to understand what it is, the suspicion that they
know what it is but don’t care, and the outdatedness of notions like originality and single
authorship on which the intelligibility of plagiarism as a concept depends.
Whenever it comes up plagiarism is a hot button topic and essays about it tend to be
philosophically and morally inflated. But there are really only two points to make. (1) Plagiarism
is a learned sin. (2) Plagiarism is not a philosophical issue.
Of course every sin is learned. Very young children do not distinguish between themselves
and the world; they assume that everything belongs to them; only in time and through the
conditioning of experience do they learn the distinction between mine and thine and so come to
acquire the concept of stealing. The concept of plagiarism, however, is learned in more
specialized contexts of practice entered into only by a few; it’s hard to get from the notion that
you shouldn’t appropriate your neighbor’s car to the notion that you should not repeat his words
without citing him.
The rule that you not use words that were first uttered or written by another without due
attribution is less like the rule against stealing, which is at least culturally universal, than it is like
the rules of golf. I choose golf because its rules are so much more severe and therefore so much
odder than the rules of other sports. In baseball you can (and should) steal bases and hide the
ball. In football you can (and should) fake a pass or throw your opponent to the ground. In
basketball you will be praised for obstructing an opposing player’s view of the court by waving
your hands in front of his face. In hockey … well let’s not go there. But in golf, if you so much as
move the ball accidentally while breathing on it far away from anyone who might have seen what
you did, you must immediately report yourself and incur the penalty. (Think of what would
happen to the base-runner called safe at home-plate who said to the umpire, “Excuse me, sir, but
although you missed it, I failed to touch third base.”)
Golf’s rules have been called arcane and it is not unusual to see play stopped while a P.G.A.
official arrives with rule book in hand and pronounces in the manner of an I.R.S. official. Both
fans and players are aware of how peculiar and “in-house” the rules are; knowledge of them is
what links the members of a small community, and those outside the community (most people in
the world) can be excused if they just don’t see what the fuss is about.
Plagiarism is like that; it’s an insider’s obsession. If you’re a professional journalist, or an
academic historian, or a philosopher, or a social scientist or a scientist, the game you play for a
living is underwritten by the assumed value of originality and failure properly to credit the work
of others is a big and obvious no-no. But if you’re a musician or a novelist, the boundary lines are
less clear (although there certainly are some) and if you’re a politician it may not occur to you, as
3/18/2021 Plagiarism Is Not a Big Moral Deal – The New York Times
https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/09/plagiarism-is-not-a-big-moral-deal/ 3/4
it did not at one time to Joe Biden, that you’re doing anything wrong when you appropriate the
speech of a revered statesman.
And if you’re a student, plagiarism will seem to be an annoying guild imposition without a
persuasive rationale (who cares?); for students, learning the rules of plagiarism is worse than
learning the irregular conjugations of a foreign language. It takes years, and while a knowledge of
irregular verbs might conceivably come in handy if you travel, knowledge of what is and is not
plagiarism in this or that professional practice is not something that will be of very much use to
you unless you end up becoming a member of the profession yourself. It follows that students
who never quite get the concept right are by and large not committing a crime; they are just
failing to become acclimated to the conventions of the little insular world they have, often
through no choice of their own, wandered into. It’s no big moral deal; which doesn’t mean, I
hasten to add, that plagiarism shouldn’t be punished — if you’re in our house, you’ve got to play
by our rules — just that what you’re punishing is a breach of disciplinary decorum, not a breach
of the moral universe.
Now if plagiarism is an idea that makes sense only in the precincts of certain specialized
practices and is not a normative philosophical notion, inquiries into its philosophical
underpinnings are of no practical interest or import. In recent years there have been a number of
assaults on the notion of originality, issuing from fields as diverse as literary theory, history,
cultural studies, philosophy, anthropology, Internet studies. Single authorship, we have been
told, is a recent invention of a bourgeois culture obsessed with individualism, individual rights
and the myth of progress. All texts are palimpsests of earlier texts; there’s been nothing new
under the sun since Plato and Aristotle and they weren’t new either; everything belongs to
everybody. In earlier periods works of art were produced in workshops by teams; the master
artisan may have signed them, but they were communal products. In some cultures, even
contemporary ones, the imitation of standard models is valued more than work that sets out to
be path-breaking. (This was one of the positions in the famous quarrel between the ancients and
the moderns in England and France in the 17th and 18th centuries.)
Arguments like these (which I am reporting, not endorsing) have been so successful in
academic circles that the very word “originality” often appears in quotation marks, and it has
seemed to many that there is a direct path from this line of reasoning to the conclusion that
plagiarism is an incoherent, even impossible, concept and that a writer or artist accused of
plagiarism is being faulted for doing something that cannot be avoided. R.M. Howard makes the
point succinctly “If there is no originality and no literary property, there is no basis for the notion
of plagiarism” (“College English,” 1995).
3/18/2021 Plagiarism Is Not a Big Moral Deal – The New York Times
https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/09/plagiarism-is-not-a-big-moral-deal/ 4/4
That might be true or at least plausible if, in order to have a basis, plagiarism would have to
stand on some philosophical ground. But the ground plagiarism stands on is more mundane and
firm; it is the ground of disciplinary practices and of the histories that have conferred on those
practices a strong, even undoubted (though revisable) sense of what kind of work can be
appropriately done and what kind of behavior cannot be tolerated. If it is wrong to plagiarize in
some context of practice, it is not because the idea of originality has been affirmed by deep
philosophical reasoning, but because the ensemble of activities that take place in the practice
would be unintelligible if the possibility of being original were not presupposed.
And if there should emerge a powerful philosophical argument saying there’s no such thing
as originality, its emergence needn’t alter or even bother for a second a practice that can only get
started if originality is assumed as a baseline. It may be (to offer another example), as I have
argued elsewhere, that there’s no such thing as free speech, but if you want to have a free speech
regime because you believe that it is essential to the maintenance of democracy, just forget what
Stanley Fish said — after all it’s just a theoretical argument — and get down to it as lawyers and
judges in fact do all the time without the benefit or hindrance of any metaphysical rap. Everyday
disciplinary practices do not rest on a foundation of philosophy or theory; they rest on a
foundation of themselves; no theory or philosophy can either prop them up or topple them. As
long as the practice is ongoing and flourishing its conventions will command respect and
allegiance and flouting them will have negative consequences.
This brings me back to the (true) story I began with. Whether there is something called
originality or not, the two scholars who began their concluding chapter by reproducing two of my
pages are professionally culpable. They took something from me without asking and without
acknowledgment, and they profited — if only in the currency of academic reputation — from
work that I had done and signed. That’s the bottom line and no fancy philosophical argument can
erase it.
Chewning 1
Susannah Chewning
Dr. Meeks
ENG 101-037
22 October 2020
I. Thesis: introduce your topic. If it’s an essay, identify the author and the title. Stanley Fish,
“Plagiarism Is Not a Big Moral Deal.” Explain how you either agree or disagree with Fish, and
explain your points of argument for agreement (a and b). Or, if you compare it to another
source, explain what the other source is and identify the points of comparison.
Agree/Disagree outline
II. Point of argument A
a. Fish quotation
b. Fish/another source quotation
III. Point of argument B
a. Fish quotation
b. Fish/another source quotation
IV. Conclusion: restate thesis; summarize
each body paragraph
V. Works Cited
Alternating Comparison outline
II. Point of comparison A
a. Fish
b. Other Source
III. Point of Comparison B
a. Fish
b. Other Source
IV. Conclusion: restate thesis; summarize
each body paragraph
V. Works Cited
Block Comparison outline
II. Fish
a. Point of comparison a
b. Point of comparison b
III. Other Source
a. Point of comparison a
b. Point of comparison b
IV. Conclusion: restate thesis; summarize each body
paragraph
V. Works Cite

Categories
English

Do you think it is important for people to believe in legends like King Arthur even if there is little evidence to support them?

Legends Essay
When you make a claim in an essay, you express an idea or opinion about information in a text. But an effective essay does more than state ideas and opinions. To persuade your readers to accept your point of view, you’ll need to support your claim with evidence, including facts, details, examples, or logical reasons. Complete the attached worksheet from lesson 4 to practice using textual evidence. You may use the ideas from the worksheet for your essay. Submitting the worksheet is optional and will not count against your grade; but will help you with understanding how to use textual evidence.
Please read the question to be answered carefully–this assignment is not asking you to write about The Legend of King Arthur. The prompt for the essay is below:
The legend of King Arthur is well-known in literature. Based on Unsolved Mysteries of History, there is little to suggest it is true. Do you think it is important for people to believe in legends like King Arthur even if there is little evidence to support them? Why or why not? Write a short (3 paragraphs) explanatory essay stating your opinion. Justify your opinion and conclusions with relevant textual evidence (quotes or paraphrased ideas from sources) and background knowledge. Remember to use relevant vocabulary from the text in your essay.

Categories
English

What do I hope the reader will learn from my essay?

Learning Goal: I’m working on a english writing question and need a sample draft to help me learn.
Develop one of the topics from your Writing Journal into an essay. In order to fully brainstorm the topic, you must use The Writing Process as described in your course textbook. Review pages 1-26 and 44-87 as you brainstorm. Pages 88-135 will assist with your thesis and help you incorporate researched material.
Finished length of the essay: Seven to Nine paragraphs, 750-1250 words (approximately 4-5 full pages in MLA-format)
Active Thinking/Brainstorm: Use “The Big Six” method to critically think about your subject. Reframe each of the six Big Six questions (who, what, when, where, why, how) in order to generate a copious amount of usable material. Your journal should act as the starting point for this brainstorm.
Use concrete language as you work and be as detailed as possible. Move beyond the surface of the topic to narrow your subject to something only you could write. Do not attempt this in one sitting. Plan to work on the brainstorm over several days so you can come back to your work with fresh eyes and add more details and analysis as you progress.
Research (2-3 sources): In order to show mastery of MLA-formatted research, you are required to include three in-text citations (but no more than five) in this essay. The sources (or, as MLA calls it, the “containers”) must be reliable. Use one of the CGTC’s Library resources to find sources.
Drafting: Remember that academic writing blends ethos, pathos, and logos. Each body paragraph must utilize these three methods of argument, not just one. You can easily establish ethos by mastering MLA formatting rules and by selecting a title for your essay that informs your reader about the essay’s content. Pathos and logos can be achieved by Actively Thinking about your subject and thoroughly using The Writing Process.
Introduction and Conclusion: These paragraphs should only be written once the thesis and body paragraphs are written. Your introduction must “hook” the reader’s attention, so the use of pathos (and possibly logos) are necessary. The conclusion should answer the question: Why should my reader/audience care about the subject of my essay? What do I hope the reader will learn from my essay?
Title: Remember that the title cannot be one word or abstract. Nor can it share the title of the research. Your title should signal to the reader what the essay is going to contain. Consider pulling a phrase from the essay and using it as your title. Review the textbook pages about creating an effective title.